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ILLUSTRATIONS & 1961 DEDICATION

FIG. 7

PLAN VIEW OF THE "MARSH BATTERY"

This view shows the battery layout, and the causeway used to supply the site. The infantry and rifle parapets on each side of the battery were intended to protect the site from attack, but were never needed. The gun deck is in the center of the battery platform. Over 13,000 sandbags were piled on the outer platform to create the gun parapet, used to protect the gun and crew from enemy fire. A large creek in front, and another on its left side, offered the site good protection from a sneak attack.

 

FIG. 8

CROSS SECTION OF THE "MARSH BATTERY"

This cross section shows the entire marsh battery. The large sandbag parapet is at the top of the illustration, resting on the floating log grillage." In the center of the grillage is the gun deck, where the "Swamp Angel" was mounted. The sheet pilings, which extend down, and form the perimeter of the gun deck, were sunken into the floor of the marsh.

 

DRIVING SHEET PILINGS. COUNTERWEIGHT METHOD

 

 

 

FIG. 9

PILE-DRIVING TECHNIQUES COUNTERWEIGHT METHOD

This pile-driving technique required a 4X4-foot platform loaded down with sandbags, used as a counterweight. The 3-inch plank piling was first stood up vertically, and allowed to sink down, as far it would go under its own weight. A long cross-pole was then tied to it, with the short end tied to the sandbag platform. A group of fifteen men then pulled down on the rope tied to the long end. The cross-pole acted as a lever, forcing the pile down into the mud substratum. This method was found to be too time consuming because of the time required to relocate the sandbag counterweight, and was therefore abandoned.

 

 

FIG. 10

PILE DRIVING TECHNIQUES-CROSS-POLE METHOD

This method was found most effective, and easily applied. This technique involved tying the cross-pole on its center, high up on the piling. Fifteen men on each end then pulled down on the ropes, forcing the piling as for down as possible. Then the cross-pole was repositioned at a point where the men, using large wooden mallets, drove the piling into the mud. After all the pilings were driven, the tops were cut evenly off.

Note that the pilings were cut on a bevel on the driven end. This bevel helped the plank cut through the mud, and also helped force the piling being driven against the piling next to it.

 

 

FIG. 11

TRELLIS WALKWAY

A walkway, built on a series of wooden trellis-like supports, was built across the marsh. This walkway became the main route for work parties and soldiers to guard them. The men walked over two planks, laid parallel, with an open space between them.

 

FIG. 12

TEST PILE

Sandbags were piled on a square platform to determine how much pressure per square inch the mud surface would support. Eventually the pile fell over as shown by the dotted line.

 

FIG. 13

PARROTT RIFLE (Or Parrott Gun)

The "Swamp Angel," a cannon type known as a Parrot rifle, was designed by Robert P. Parrott, and cast at the West Point Foundry in Cold Springs, New York in 1863. This cannon, a new type of ordnance at the time, had a rifted bore, and reinforced breech for greater accuracy and range.

The reinforced breech consisted of a thick wrought-iron bond encircling the rear of the gun, at the seat of the gunpowder charge. Parrott’s had greater range and accuracy than the big smoothbores also in use at that time.

 

 

 

 

THE SWAMP ANGEL

THE FIRST GUN, AN EIGHT INCH PARROTT

RIFLE OR 200 POUNDER, FIRED FROM THE

MARSH BATTERY, ON MORRIS ISLAND, S.C.

AT THE CITY OF CHARLESTON, 7,000 YARDS

DISTANCE. WEIGHT OF GUN 16,500 POUNDS

WEIGHT OF CHARGE OF POWDER 16 POUNDS.

AND WEIGHT OF PROJECTILE 150 POUNDS.

GREATEST ELEVATION USED 35 .

BOMBARDMENT OPENED AUGUST 12,1863-

GUN BURST AT 36TH ROUND.

ERECTED FEBRUARY 1871 AT CORNER OF

NO. CLINTON AVENUE AND PERRY STREET,

TRENTON. REDEDICATED AT CADWALADER

PARK ON  1OOTH ANNIVERSARY OF START

OF AMERICAN CIVIL WAR APRIL 12,1961

 

FIG. 14

NEW PLAQUE-DEDICATED APRIL 12,1961

The above description is from the new plaque, which was installed on the monument in 1961. It should be noted that the opening date, given, as August 12th is incorrect, as is the gun weight. For historical accuracy it should be noted that the gun was first fired on August 22nd 1863, and the gun weight, here given as 16,500 pounds, (which is the standard weight for this class gun), was actually 16,577 pounds.

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